Home Early Childhood Education Professional Development: It Might be Summer, but Teachers are Hard at Work Building Skills

Professional Development: It Might be Summer, but Teachers are Hard at Work Building Skills

by Margaret Brown
Professional Development

Today’s Modern Educator curates news about a variety of education-related topics. In this roundup we share news about professional development for educators from how Toledo Public Schools will be using state funding for teacher training and how the Toledo Public Schools will use state funding for training and learn about a survey that found that teachers nationwide believe a more unified education system for children younger than 8 years old would help to establish a common foundation in early childhood education that would align teaching and student learning. Read the news here:

Many Teachers Favor a More Integrated Early Education System, National Survey Finds

A survey by the National Association for the Education of Young Children found that 76 percent of current and former K-3 teachers nationwide believe a more unified education system for children younger than 8 years old would help to establish a common foundation in early childhood education that would align teaching and student learning. This unified system refers to creating a more fluid transition from the preschool system to the elementary system. In an ideal setting this means teacher qualifications, compensation and classroom practice would be better aligned. It can also mean teachers share the same vision for how to educate young students and have access to similar professional development opportunities and funding streams for programs. Read the article here.

Common Sense Media Overhauls Popular Digital Citizenship Curriculum

One of the most widely used K-12 digital-citizenship curriculum in the country is getting an overhaul—further evidence of the growing challenge schools face in dealing with fake news and helping students understand the ethical concerns surrounding big technology and social-media companies. According to the founder of nonprofit Common Sense Media, “Educators need resources to keep up with today’s fast-changing media and technology landscape, especially because the walls between school and home have come down.” About 500,000 educators and 72,000 schools are registered users of Common Sense’s existing digital citizenship curriculum. Significantly updated versions will be released for various grade levels throughout the coming school year, starting with grades 3-5 this August. Read the article here.

New Research: Despite Great Enthusiasm for Personalized Learning, Teachers Say Attempts to Innovate Are Often Stymied by School District Bureaucracy

According to new research from the Center on Reinventing Public Education, when school districts adopt personalized learning, the bulk of the work falls to teachers, who, while excited about the opportunity to innovate, often are not supported by their school systems to implement and share their ideas. The research comes at a critical moment for the personalized learning field, as scant evidence has emerged to demonstrate whether the billions of dollars invested in these scattered efforts are paying off. However, while students and teachers both reported preferring the individualized style of instruction that is a hallmark of personalized learning, but they felt stymied by a lack of support and ambiguity in expectations from their superiors. Read the article here.

Toledo Public Schools Receives More Than $1 Million in Funding From State

The Ohio Department of Education awarded Toledo Public Schools nearly $1.2 million as part of the U.S. Department of Education’s Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy Grant. TPS will spend the majority of the money on professional development and will develop teams of pre-K through third-grade teachers in its elementary schools that will participate in professional development every other month. The professional development includes curriculum training, teacher strategies, and stages of literacy development. Each team will receive its training together as a unit, and the district, in turn, expects that training to translate to the classroom, thereby enhancing literacy rates. Ohio was one of 11 states that received money from the U.S. Department of Education. Only three states received more than the $35 million awarded to Ohio. Read the article here.

 

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